In their earliest years of athletics, they were referred to as the “Alleganies,” then they derived the name the “Brownies."

St. Bonaventure was represented by the Brown Indians, sporting the colors Brown and White, starting in the fall of 1927. The Seneca Nation, which is located close to the university in Salamanca, N.Y., found the title to be very prideful.

The first student to take on a cheerleading role of the Brown Indian was in 1961, and then accompanied by the Brown Squaw, which was created in 1967. In 1991, the university had Carson Waterman, a member of the Seneca Nation, paint a logo at center court at the Reilly Center. However, in 1992 the university made the decision to change their Brown Indians as their mascot. A few years later, the Bona Fanatic was created.

While the Brown Indian was a more common nickname, the Bonnies term was used for decades right along with it. The term "Bonnies" came to be as a short-cut name of St. Bonaventure without any official starting point. 

The Bona Fanatic made its debut as the team mascot in 1996 but only lasted two years. In 1998, a committee was formed to derive a new mascot, and the Bona Wolf was created. The Bona Wolf made its debut on Feb. 16, 1999 against Rhode Island. The wolf has links to Franciscan tradition (see below).

Although the mascot and nickname have changed over the years, what has remained the same are the Brown and White colors, the Brown from the Friars’ habits and the White from their white cords.

Why the wolf? 

The mascot has ties to the Franciscan tradition that friars of the school live upon. Legend has it that St. Francis of Assisi tamed a fierce wolf at Gubbio, Italy. Thus, this new mascot would also help to represent the religious aspect which is so closely related to St. Bonaventure University itself. Below is the entire story:

During the period when Francis was living in Gubbio, a fierce wolf appeared in the country and began attacking livestock. Soon the wolf graduated to direct assaults on humans, and not long after began to dine upon them exclusively. It was known for lingering outside of the city gates in wait for anyone foolish enough to venture beyond them alone. No weapon was capable of inflicting injury upon the wolf, and all who attempted to destroy it were devoured. Eventually mere sight of the animal caused the entire city to raise alarm and the public refused to go outside the walls for any reason. It was at this point, when Gubbio was under siege, that Francis announced he was going to take leave and meet the wolf. He was advised against this more than once but, irrespective of the warnings, made the sign of the Cross and went beyond the gates with a small group of followers in tow. When he neared the lair of the wolf the crowd held back at a safe distance, but remained close enough to witness what transpired.

The wolf, having seen the group approach, rushed at Francis with its jaws open. Again Francis made the sign of the Cross and commanded the wolf to cease its attacks in the name of God, at which point the wolf trotted up to him docilely and lay at his feet, putting its head in his hands. The Fioretti then describes word-for-word his dealings with the wolf:

"Brother wolf, thou hast done much evil in this land, destroying and killing the creatures of God without his permission; yea, not animals only hast thou destroyed, but thou hast even dared to devour men, made after the image of God; for which thing thou art worthy of being hanged like a robber and a murderer. All men cry out against thee, the dogs pursue thee, and all the inhabitants of this city are thy enemies; but I will make peace between them and thee, O brother wolf, is so be thou no more offend them, and they shall forgive thee all thy past offences, and neither men nor dogs shall pursue thee anymore."  The wolf bowed its head and submitted to Francis, completely at his mercy.

"As thou art willing to make this peace, I promise thee that thou shalt be fed every day by the inhabitants of this land so long as thou shalt live among them; thou shalt no longer suffer hunger, as it is hunger which has made thee do so much evil; but if I obtain all this for thee, thou must promise, on thy side, never again to attack any animal or any human being; dost thou make this promise?"

In agreement, the wolf placed one of its forepaws in Francis' outstretched hand, and the oath was made. Francis then commanded the wolf to return with him to Gubbio. Meanwhile the townsfolk, having heard of the miracle, gathered in the city marketplace to await Francis and his companion, and were shocked to see the ferocious wolf behaving as though his pet. When Francis reached the marketplace he offered the assembled crowd an impromptu sermon with the tame wolf at his feet. He is quoted as saying: "How much we ought to dread the jaws of hell, if the jaws of so small an animal as a wolf can make a whole city tremble through fear?" With the sermon ended Francis renewed his pact with the wolf publicly, assuring it that the people of Gubbio would feed it from their very doors if it ceased its depredations. Once more the wolf placed its paw in Francis' hand.

St. Bonaventure Athletic Fight Song and Alma Mater Song:

Unfurl the Brown and White by L.G. O’Brien (Class of 1925) and C.R. Kean (Class of 1924)
YouTube Video 

Alma Mater (H.A. Mooney, ’09)

Unfurl the Brown and White
Into the breeze;
Snow of the mountain height;
Brown of the trees!
Emblem of loyalty,
Manhood, and might,
We love thy shining folds of Brown and White!

Hark! The trumpets are calling.
Drums like thunder resound.
Feet in rhythm are falling-
Armies shaking the ground!
Rise to the march.
Fill the sky with a throaty cheer. Rah!

Unfurl the Brown and White
Into the breeze;
Snow of the mountain height;
Brown of the trees!
Emblem of loyalty,
Manhood, and might,
We love thy shining folds of Brown and White!

With myrtle wreath we’ll deck thy brow,
Bona’s, old St. Bona’s.
The verdant leaves our love avow,
Bona’s, old St. Bona’s.
Thy name was ever fair and bright:
We’ll keep it thus with memory’s light
And laud thy glorious Brown and White,
Bona’s, old St. Bona’s.
Our hearts shall ever be thy shrine
Bona’s, old St. Bona’s.
Around thy name shall honor twine,
Bona’s, old St. Bona’s.
E’er hallowed shall thy memory grow;
Through years have fled and years shall flow,
Within our souls thy love shall glow,
Bona’s, old St. Bona’s.


Primary St. Bonaventure Athletic Logos throughout the years: